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NLTK Tokenize: Exercises with Solution

Python NLTK Tokenize [9 exercises with solution]

What is Tokenize?

Tokenization is the process of demarcating and possibly classifying sections of a string of input characters. The resulting tokens are then passed on to some other form of processing. The process can be considered a sub-task of parsing input.

1. Write a Python NLTK program to split the text sentence/paragraph into a list of words.
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2. Write a Python NLTK program to tokenize sentences in languages other than English.
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3. Write a Python NLTK program to create a list of words from a given string.
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4. Write a Python NLTK program to split all punctuation into separate tokens.
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5. Write a Python NLTK program to tokenize words, sentence wise.
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6. Write a Python NLTK program to tokenize a twitter text.
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7. Write a Python NLTK program to remove Twitter username handles from a given twitter text.
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8. Write a Python NLTK program that will read a given text through each line and look for sentences. Print each sentence and divide two sentences with "==============".
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9. Write a Python NLTK program to find parenthesized expressions in a given string and divides the string into a sequence of substrings.
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More to Come !

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Python: Tips of the Day

F strings:

It is a common practice to add variables inside strings. F strings are by far the coolest way of doing it. To appreciate the f strings more, let's first perform the operation with the format function.

name = 'Owen'
age = 25
print("{} is {} years old".format(name, age))

Output:

Owen is 25 years old

We specify the variables that go inside the curly braces by using the format function at the end. F strings allow for specifying the variables inside the string.

name = 'Owen'
age = 25
print(f"{name} is {age} years old")

Output:

Owen is 25 years old

F strings are easier to follow and type. Moreover, they make the code more readable.

A, B, C = {2, 4, 6}
print(A, B, C)
A, B, C = ['p', 'q', 'r']
print(A, B, C)

Output:

2 4 6
p q r